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'We must put ourselves in the position of the subject who tries to find his way in this world, and we must remember, first of all, that the environment by which he is influenced and to which he adapts himself is his world, not the objective world of science.'

W.I. Thomas
and
F. Znaniecki

Qualitative Sociology Review
2006
Volume II Issue 2


Contributors


Yeslam Al-Saggaf (PhD) is a lecturer in the School of Information Studies, an Associate Course Coordinator for GradDipInfoTech/MInfoTech/MInfoSys at Charles Sturt University, Australia and a Research Fellow at the Centre for Applied Philosophy and Public Ethics. He holds a bachelor's degree in engineering (computer and information engineering) from Malaysia, and a master of information technology and a PhD from Charles Sturt University, Australia. His research interests lie in the areas of online communities (both social and political) and the online political public sphere in the Arab world. He has published in those areas in a number of international refereed journals as well as presenting at a number of international conferences.

Contact: yalsaggaf@csu.edu.au


Kirsty Williamson (PhD) is the Director of the research group, Information and Telecommunications Needs Research (ITNR), a joint initiative of Monash and Charles Sturt Universities. Since the early 1990s, she has undertaken many research projects, funded by a range of different organisations including the Telstra Fund for Social and Policy Research, Department of Communications, Information Technology and the Arts (DCITA), and the Australian Research Council. Her interests are in a wide range of topics, many of which are related to the use of the Internet as is the present article. Kirsty also teaches research methods at Charles Sturt University and supervises PhD students there.

Contact: kirsty.williamson@infotech.monash.edu.au


Bruce Arnold (PhD) is an Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology at the University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada. With a background in quantitative sociology and anthropology, his current research interests questions are located within sociological social cognition, sociology of emotions, and death and dying drawing from phenomenological, autoethnographic and narrative analysis methodologies. Current research includes death and dying, phenomenology of self, and emotion and small groups dynamics.

Contact: barnold@ucalgary.ca


Val Gillies is a Senior Research Fellow in the Families & Social Capital ESRC Research Group at London South Bank University. She has researched and published widely in the area of family and social class. Her most recent publications include Marginalised Mothers: Exploring Working Class Parenting, along with various journal articles and book chapters on parenting and social policy, young people's family lives and qualitative research methods.

Contact: gilliev@lsbu.ac.uk


Rosalind Edwards is Professor in Social Policy and Director of the Families & Social Capital ESRC Research Group at London South Bank University (www.lsbu.ac.uk/families). Her research interests mainly focus on family policy and family life, especially in relation to gender, class and ethnicity, on which she has published widely. She also has an interest in methodology as founding and co-editor of the International Journal of Social Research Methodology: Theory and Practice.

Contact: edwardra@lsbu.ac.uk


Noriko Milman (MA) is a doctoral student in the Department of Sociology at the University of California, Los Angeles. Her research interests include: childhood, primary education, urban schooling, and race/ethnicity. She is currently using qualitative methods to study kids' culture among first graders in an urban elementary school. Prior to graduate school, Noriko was a first grade teacher in the Compton Unified School District, located in southern California.

Contact: mnmilman@ucla.edu


Jerome Rabow (PhD) is Professor Emeritus, Department of Sociology, University of California, Los Angles and Lecturer at California State University, Northridge. Recent books include Voices of Pain, Voices of Hope: Students Speak about Racism. Kendall Hunt, Dubuque Iowa, 2006; Excellent Teaching in the Excellent University, Academica Press, Bethesda MD, 2006; Tutoring Matters: Everything You Always Wanted to Know about Tutoring, Temple Univ. Press. Phila. PA.1999. (with T. Chin and N. Fahimian) In 2005 he wrote, produced, and directed a documentry about teaching race at university and high school levels. The video, "Voices of Hope" is available at www.pyramidmedia.com .

Contact: jrabow@soc.ucla.edu


Robert A. Kenedy is a sociologist at York University, Canada. He has been studying identity issues since 1984 with much of his research focusing on collective identity, as well as ethnic communities and identity formation. He has written the book Fathers for Justice: The Rise of a New Social Movement in Canada as a Case Study of Collective Identity Formation. His recent work examines ethnic identity within several different immigrant groups in the city of Toronto. Dr. Kenedy has examined divergent issues related to ethnic communities in Canada such as civic identity among immigrants, as well as Jewish identity and Diasporas.

Contact: rkenedy@yorku.ca


Baudouin Dupret is educated in Law, Arabic and Islamic Sciences, and Political Sciences. He is research fellow at the French National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS) and was based for several years in Cairo, Egypt, at the French Institute (CEDEJ). He is now based in Damascus, Syria, at the Institut Français du Proche-Orient (IFPO). He has published extensively in the field of the sociology and anthropology of law in the Middle East. His current work involves a praxiological approach to the production of truth in Arab contexts, including courts and parliaments, scientific expertise, the media, and religious education. He (co-)edited several volumes, among which Standing Trial: Law and the Person in the Modern Middle East (Tauris, 2004). He is the author of Au nom de quel droit. Répertoires juridiques et référence religieuse dans la société égyptienne musulmane contemporaine (Paris, Maison des sciences de l'homme, 2000) and Le Jugement en action. Ethnométhodologie du droit, de la morale et de la justice en Egypte (Geneva, Librairie Droz, 2006).

Contact: dupret@link.net


Alexander Kozin (PhD) is a Research Fellow at the Freie Universität Berlin, Germany. His interests reside at the juncture of phenomenology, semiotics, and social interactionism. He published in the areas of phenomenology, semiotics, psychology, and communication. His current work is located in the sociolegal field, where, as a member of international project "Comparative Microsociology of Criminal Defence", he examines criminal defence casework in the legal context of the United States.

Contact: alex.kozin@gmx.net


Frank Nutch (PhD) teaches sociology of science and the sociology of everyday life at Trent University, Peterborough, Ontario, Canada. He received his MA from the University of Hawaii - Manoa and his PhD from York University, Toronto, Ontario. His main research focus in the sociology of science and scientific knowledge has been in investigating the use, history, and development of the scientific field research technique of photographic identification of cetecea (whales, dolphins, and porpoises). He is currently writing a book based on his two decades of participant observation research with marine field scientists, tentatively titled: Scientists at Work: Reflections on doing fieldwork with marine scientists.

Contact: fnutch@trentu.ca


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